Are your diamonds conflict-free?

Are your diamonds conflict-free?

Right after the core meeting, I informed some friends of my decision to watch a movie, a reasonable treat for myself after having finished a 14-page lab report. Having had no idea what to watch, I asked around. I figured I didn't want to any of the MMFF entries anymore. I've seen Kasal, Kasali, Kasalo twice: the first was with my cousin, the second with Paul. In both instances, I felt like melted agar; it was too cheesy, but the script was humorous, I tell you. And I had fun.

So anyway, we had a hearty dinner at KFC in the newly constructed annex of SM North EDSA called the Block. There were seven of us: Jaylord, Paul, Shean, Es, and Al. Of course, there was Kuya Dave. He had just arrived after ministering to PMA in Baguio, and he decided to spend the afternoon with us. We had a nice chat about what we did during the break, the things we have to finish for school, among others. Fifteen minutes before the start of the film, we bought our tickets. We were that early because Kuya Dave is Welsh. He's never late.

The movie we watched was called Blood Diamond. It's a moving story about the conflict involving the diamond industry in Sierra Leone and Liberia. The theme revolves around fatherhood, friendship, violence, pain, and love--and that much I can say because I don't want to spoil it for you. I think the script was exceptionally written, the actors really played their parts, and the cinematography was not fancy at all--the movie looked very real. And yes, it's definitely not for the faint-hearted. I had to endure Es' frequent outbursts of shrieks whenever violent scenes were shown. Paul kept grabbing my arm when something horrible came up.

When I arrived here a couple of minutes ago, I immediately messaged my online friends, urging them to watch Blood Diamond. It's something you don't want to miss because if you do, it's like letting a perfectly wonderful opportunity pass.

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