Miracles

CS Lewis's Miracles is my bedside reading material.

MY BEDSIDE reading material is C. S. Lewis's Miracles, a short, albeit meaningful book about whether miracles are possible in the world. It's not a very easy, breezy book to read, but C. S. Lewis makes very strong arguments, dividing the world's thinkers into Naturalists and Supernaturalists. I admire his restraint and economy of words. I admire, too, the depth of his thinking, which, on the surface, seem simple but are actually profound. His analogies are funny, witty, and accessible.

He writes:

"All possible knowledge, then, depends on the validity of reasoning. If the certainty of which we express by words like must be and therefore and since is a real perception of how things outside our own minds really 'must be', well and good. But if this certainty is merely a feeling in our own minds and not a genuine insight into realities beyond them—if this merely represents the way our minds happen to work—then we can have no knowledge. Unless human reasoning is valid no science can be true."

I read a chapter of this book daily before I go to sleep. This is in addition to my Bible reading (I follow the ESV iPad app) and the Oncology chapter of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. This is also in addition to my twice weekly episode dose of Stanger Things.

I love C. S. Lewis, notwithstanding the fact that we have similar glasses.

He seems to tell me, "Gaya-gaya ka ng salamin."

I praise God for the rare but treasured moments of calm before sleep. It's not every day that I get to experience them, but I'm glad nonetheless.

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